Though wild rice is technically the seeds of aquatic grasses,

Though wild rice is technically the seeds of aquatic grasses,

it’s popularly used like rice in the kitchen.

It’s recognized as a whole grain and contains about three times more fiber and significantly more protein than white rice, making it a more filling choice (3Trusted Source, 14Trusted Source).

Additionally, it’s been linked to a number of health benefits in animal studies.

For example, rodent studies indicate that replacing white rice with wild rice effectively reduces triglyceride and cholesterol levels, insulin resistance, and oxidative stress — big risk factors for heart disease (15Trusted Source, 16Trusted Source, 17Trusted Source).

Wild rice is a good source of vitamins and minerals, including B vitamins, magnesium, and manganese. What’s more, research shows that its antioxidant activity is up to 30 times greater than that of white rice (18Trusted Source).

SUMMARY
Brown, black, red, and wild rice are all nutritious options that contain an impressive array of nutrients and disease-fighting plant compounds.

Less nutritious varieties
There isn’t anything wrong with eating white rice or packaged rice blends in moderation, but they lack the nutritious qualities of the varieties mentioned above.

White rice
White rice has had the husk, bran, and germ removed. Though this process extends the shelf life of the final product, the nutrients and beneficial plant compounds found in the bran and germ are lost during processing.

As a result, it contains less fiber, protein, antioxidants, and certain vitamins and minerals than brown rice.

Since white rice is lower in fiber and protein, it’s also less filling and has more of an impact on blood sugar than brown rice (19Trusted Source).

It’s much lower in antioxidants than brown, black, red, or wild varieties as well (20Trusted Source, 21Trusted Source).

Pre-made and packaged blends
While certain packaged rice blends can make a healthy choice, many others are high in calories, sodium, and unnecessary ingredients.

For example, a 1-cup (150-gram) serving of Uncle Ben’s Teriyaki Flavor Ready Rice packs 870 mg of sodium — nearly 38% of the recommended intake (22, 23Trusted Source).

Consuming too much sodium can increase your risk of serious health conditions, such as heart disease and stroke (24Trusted Source).

Additionally, processed products can contain added sugars, artificial colorings, and preservatives — ingredients that you should limit for optimal health (25Trusted Source, 26Trusted Source).

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